Sociology PhDs on the Job Market


Elisabeth Anderson, Ph.D.

aeander@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Office Hours: W 2:00-3:00 PM, Clark 515, Rm. 202

Dissertation Title: 

“Policy Entrepreneurs and Institutional Change: The Politics of Nineteenth-Century Child Labor Reform in Germany and the U.S.”

Areas of Interest: 

Comparative/historical sociology, political sociology, sociology of childhood and youth, welfare states and social policy, gender, and theory.

Biography:

My core research goal is to develop a historically grounded theoretical understanding of why states devote resources to protecting groups that seem politically, economically, and socially powerless. My dissertation explores this question through an analysis of the political origins and development of nineteenth-century child labor regulation and factory inspection in Germany and the United States. Through four case studies, two in each country, I find that these policies came about not as a direct result of industrialization, working-class mobilizations, or institutional feedbacks—as existing sociological theories of social policy change propose—but as a consequence of elite policy entrepreneurs’ dedicated reform advocacy. Relying on in-depth inductive analysis of archival materials and published primary and secondary sources, I explicate the culturally-embedded ideas that informed these reformers’ understanding of the child labor problem and motivated their political action. Furthermore, I identify the alliance-building strategies through which they forged coalitions to overcome political barriers and successfully effect institutional change. On the basis of this analysis I develop a theoretical model of policy change which challenges existing theories of the welfare state by bringing actors, their ideas, and their creative political action to the fore. I use the model to show that similar policy outcomes need not have the same social-structural causes, and that the link between social-structural conditions and institutional change depends on the mediating intervention of agents who exercise judgment, creativity, and choice. I have published two single-authored papers in Theory and Society, the more recent of which won the Charles Tilly prize for best article from the ASA’s Comparative and Historical Sociology section. My other publications appear in Social Science History and Contemporary Sociology.

Back to top

 


 


Amelia Branigan

amelia.branigan@northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

“The Social Relevance of Visible Phenotypical Characteristics for Educational Outcomes”

Areas of Interest: 

Social Inequality; Sociology of Education; Race and Ethnicity; Sociology of Health and Illness.

Biography:

Amelia Branigan studies the relationship between elements of the physical body and socioeconomic inequality, with a particular focus on educational disparities. Her dissertation, “The Social Relevance of Visible Phenotypical Characteristics for Educational Outcomes,” argues that the visible body is itself a social fact, and that by omitting physical variation from quantitative analysis of inequality, social scientists render invisible systems of inequality that persist within social categories such as sex and race. Through three studies using large national datasets, she demonstrates such within-sex and within-race variation in educational attainment and achievement by phenotype, and offers suggestions for better engaging the visible body in sociological research on inequality. The first of these studies was published in Social Science Research. A second line of work assesses the environmental contingence of the relationship between genes and educational attainment, and a meta-analysis of estimates of the heritability of attainment across sex, nation, and birth cohort was published in Social Forces. Amelia is currently the Frank H. T. Rhodes Postdoctoral Fellow at the Cornell Population Center at Cornell University, where she is completing a series of papers extending her dissertation work on obesity and educational performance, while training in spatial analysis for a new project on how threat of violence between home and school affects health and educational outcomes.

Back to top


Kiyona Brewster

KiyonaBrewster2008@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Biography:

I am a PhD candidate in Sociology at Northwestern University where I am also pursuing a certificate in graduate teaching and gender and sexuality studies. My research and teaching interests are in gender, religion, family studies, feminist theory, and qualitative methods. Using ethnography, my research examines how gender and familial roles are defined and maintained within predominantly African American Protestant and Evangelical communities of faith. Data for this research were collected at two congregations that varied by denomination and ideological leaning located in a suburb of Chicago, Illinois. I found that evangelical husbands and wives possess strong traditional beliefs about family life especially with regard to work, parenting, and divisions of household labor. I also found that couples employ a number of practical and rhetorical strategies to reconcile negotiations of submission and spousal power with daily routines and religious teachings. Likewise, traditional notions of family life were maintained at each worship site through the use of sermon content; pictures and imagery; informal codes for dress and personal grooming; targeted small group offerings; and in some cases, a gendered use of space. Findings from this work hold implications for larger discussions about the influence of contemporary congregations on African American family life as well as feminist theories about religion and women’s agency.

 

Back to top


Daphne Demetry

DaphneDemetry2013@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

"Episodic Organizations: Survival and Continuity of Pop-up Restaurants and Underground Supper Clubs"

Areas of Interest:

Culture, Organizational Theory, Economic Sociology, Consumers and Consumption, Entrepreneurship, Food Studies, and Ethnographic Methods

Biography:

My research and teaching interests include culture, organizational theory, economic sociology, consumption, and entrepreneurship. I investigate these issues primarily through ethnographic methods and the case study of the culinary industry.

My dissertation work investigates a central paradox of organizational studies: how does an organization maintain continuity when the environment it inhabits is in perpetual change? To answer this question I investigate what I call "episodic organizations," defined as a repeating, temporary and project-based form of doing business. I examine two archetypal episodic organizations that have gained increased attention in the culinary realm: pop-up restaurants and underground supper clubs. These organizations are temporary social dining establishments which operate in non-restaurant spaces, akin to a paid dinner party. I am studying the puzzle of pop-up and supper club endurance: how does an episodic organization endure and thrive despite its transitory nature? I draw from ethnographic participant observation and interview data across Chicago, Los Angeles, London, and San Francisco to examine the mechanisms that enable episodic organizations to maintain flux and stability. In addition, I investigate the entrepreneurial transition from running a pop-up or supper club organization to a permanent business.

Back to top



Theodore (Theo) Greene

TheodoreGreene2008@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Office Hours: T 2:00-3:30 PM, Norbucks


Dissertation Title: 

“Not in MY Gayborhood: Gay Neighborhoods and the Rise of the Vicarious Citizen”

Areas of Interest: 

Urban/Community Sociology; Sexualities; Race, Class, and Gender; Social Movements; Qualitative Methods

Biography:

Theo Greene is a doctoral candidate in Sociology and a graduate certificate candidate in the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program. His research, broadly conceived, considers how the cultural, political, and economic conditions of the postindustrial city shape and reconfigure how individuals conceptualize, identify to, and participate in urban communities. Much of this research focuses on how marginalized populations, who find themselves increasingly displaced from and priced out urban land markets through private and municipal redevelopment strategies, develop various strategies to situate themselves as legitimate stakeholders in the production and use of space and place

Supported by dissertation grants from The Sexualities Project and The Graduate School at Northwestern, Greene’s dissertation uses gay neighborhoods to develop the notion of vicarious citizenship – the exercise of rights and claims-making from non-residential stakeholders who personally identify politically, economically, and socio-culturally to a neighborhood or locality. Vicarious citizens represent a diversity of racial, socio-economic, and aged-based stakeholders who draw on a variety of socio-territorial practices to mobilize against perceived cultural and political threats to their visions of authentic community. At times, vicarious citizens may retain differing and sometimes conflicting perspectives on the functions of community, challenging the claims of local residents and those with more material ties to the local area. In the context of gay neighborhoods, he argues how vicarious citizenship can expand our understanding of how gay neighborhoods remain relevant among certain LGBT populations who, for a variety of reasons, select into neighborhoods outside established gay areas. Greene’s research draws primarily on ethnographic data collected from three gay neighborhoods in Washington, DC, archival and newspaper data, and interviews with 65 individuals who lived, worked, or socialized in Washington, DC's gay neighborhoods.

Selected Publications:

Greene, Theodore. 2014. “Gay Neighborhoods and the Rights of the Vicarious Citizen.” City & Community 13(2): 99 – 118.

Back to top


Jeffrey Kosbie

j-kosbie@nlaw.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

Contested Identities: A History of LGBT Legal Mobilization and the “Ethics of Impact”

Areas of Interest:

Law and Society, Social Movements, Sexualities, Gender, Inequality, Institutional Theory

Biography:

My research theorizes law as a field for constructing and contesting identities around gender and sexuality. I study how law creates and perpetuates inequalities and how it is used to challenge inequalities. I address this overarching problem from multiple disciplinary angles. I engage with legal literatures related to constitutional history and theory, civil procedure and federal courts, and queer and feminist legal theory. I engage with sociological literatures related to law and society, social movements, organizations and institutions, and gender and sexualities.

My dissertation uses original data to tell the history of the major LGBT legal organizations. Drawing on extensive interviews and archival research, I argue that internal organizational debates drive strategic decision making processes at these organizations. I received a National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant to support this research. Other support includes a dissertation fellowship from the Sexualities Project at Northwestern University and Graduate Research Grant from The Graduate School at Northwestern University.

Links:

http://jkosbie.com

 

Back to top



Elizabeth Onasch

e-onasch@u.northwestern.edu
Onasche@newschool.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

“Integration through Racialization: A Study of Symbolic Boundaries in the French Reception and Integration Contract"

Areas of Interest:

Race and Ethnicity, Immigration, Political Sociology, Comparative and Historical Sociology, Cultural Sociology, and Sociology of Knowledge

Biography:

I am currently a Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Sociology Department at the New School for Social Research. I am broadly interested in the intersection of race, nationalism, and international immigration, and the social construction and institutional effects of racial and national identities. My dissertation examined the formation of symbolic boundaries, or conceptual differences, in French integration programs for non-EU migrants. I compared how the program draws different combinations of boundaries based on language, religion and culture between the French nation and migrants from three regions: North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and East Asia. I traced the historical lineages of these boundaries and showed how the programs serve as sites of racialization, or the reproduction of hierarchical and essentialist notions of difference between Europeans and non-Europeans. The project relied on a combination of qualitative data, including ethnographic fieldwork, interviews with program participants and personnel, content analysis of policy documents, and secondary historical sources. I am currently studying citizenship test preparation courses in New York City in order to build an American comparison case and test the theoretical framework of racialization through symbolic boundaries, which I developed to understand the French context.

I have been awarded several grants and fellowships to support my research, including a Graduate Research Grant from The Graduate School at Northwestern University, a Northwestern University Sociology Research Fellowship, a Doctoral Exchange Fellowship from the L'Institut d'Etudes Politiques and two MacArthur Research Grants. In 2013, I published a book chapter with Marjukka Weide, entitled, “Teaching Integration in France and Finland: A Comparison of National Discourses within Civic Integration Programmes" in a volume which I co-edited with Heidi Vad Jonsson, Saara Pellander, and Mats Wickstrom, entitled, "Migrations and Welfare States: Policies, Discourses, and Institutions," published by the Nordic Centre of Excellence NordWel.


Back to top


Cassidy Puckett

Cassidy@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

"The Geek Instinct: Technological Change, Digital Adaptability, and Social Inequality"

Areas of Interest:

Sociology of Education, Communication and Information Technology, Culture, Inequality, Sociological Theory, Organizations, and Mixed Methods

Biography:

Broadly, my research interests include theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues related to the study of technological change. I am particularly interested in the conceptualization and measurement of technological competence; how this has changed over time and influenced the organization of schooling; what shapes technological competence over the life course; and how differences in competence may influence various forms of social inequality.

My dissertation, "The Geek Instinct: Technological Change, Digital Adaptability, and Social Inequality," investigates what it means to be a successful learner in the digital age. Youth often are assumed to be “digital natives” who master technology through simple immersion, yet research reveals substantial variation in kids’ ability to adapt to technological change that may exacerbate social inequality. Using ethnographic observations and interviews as well as a broader survey of Chicago Public School students, involving a total of ~1300 adolescents from diverse backgrounds, my research investigates the potential causes and consequences of differences in approach to technology learning. I find that practices—particularly those outside of school—may influence learning approach more so than material resources and that these differences may, in turn, influence educational and occupational trajectories.

Prior to Northwestern, I worked as a Research Associate at an educational research and evaluation company called Rockman et al and taught Web Design & Robotics at Urban Promise Academy Middle School in Oakland, CA. I also earned a master's degree in education through the Learning, Design and Technology program at Stanford University and a bachelor's degree from Brown University.

Select Publications (in chronological order):

Puckett, Cassidy. 2013. “Technology Education.” Book Section in Sociology of Education: An A-to-Z Guide, edited by James Ainsworth. Sage Publications.

Puckett, Cassidy and Eszter Hargittai. 2012. “From Dot-Edu to Dot-Com: Predictors of College Students’ Job and Career Information Seeking.” Sociological Focus 45(1): 85-102.*

Puckett, Cassidy. 2012. “Review of Matrix Multiplication and the Digital Divide by Oscar H. Gandy, Jr. in Race After the Internet” In HASTAC Book Review, Duke University.

* peer reviewed

Manuscripts Under Review:

Puckett, Cassidy. “The Geek Instinct: Technological Competence and Cultural Alignment in Disadvantaged Contexts.”

Puckett, Cassidy. “Measuring Digital Adaptability: Scale Development and Validation.”

Publications in Preparation:

Puckett, Cassidy. “How Culture Structures Opportunity: Explaining Differences in Adolescents Approach to Learning Technology.”

Select Awards:

Mellon/American Council of Learned Societies Dissertation Grant (2014-2015).
Honorable Mention, CITASA Best Student Paper Award (2014).
National Science Foundation Dissertation Improvement Grant (2013-2014).
Multidisciplinary Program in Education Sciences Graduate Fellow (2010-2013).
Clogg Fellowship to ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods (2010).

Links:

Mellon/American Council of Learned Societies
Interfolio

 

Back to top


Jennifer Rosen

JenniferRosen2014@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

"Explaining Women's Parliamentary Representation: Political Institutions, Development Thresholds, and Gender Equality in National Politics"

Areas of Interest:

Statistics and Mixed Research Methods; Sex and Gender; Political Sociology; International and Comparative Sociology; Intersectionality.

Biography:

Women’s representation in national legislatures exhibits substantial variation across countries and over time. A particularly surprising aspect of this variation over the past twenty years is that many countries with low levels of socioeconomic development have outpaced developed democracies in enhancing the formal political representation of women. I argue that models designed to explain women’s enhanced representation are actually inadequate when applied to less developed countries, especially African and Latin American post-conflict societies. Using a nested research design, I construct and evaluate an original cross-national, time-series dataset (168 countries from 1992-2010). Next, I conduct two in-depth case studies (Tanzania and France) and 18 abbreviated case comparisons in order to understand how and why the factors identified by the statistical analyses matter.

My results show that two of most important variables identified in the literature -- gender quotas and electoral systems -- have different, even contradictory, effects on women’s political representation across development thresholds. Each component of the nested design provides consistent evidence that socioeconomic development interacts with key causal mechanisms, altering how they affect the political representation of women across levels of development. Given that the under-representation of women in politics may have serious consequences for political agendas, the articulation of women’s interests, and the legitimacy of democratic institutions, my research offers new insight into the best ways to promote gender balance in politics. The results also suggest that universal generalizations derived from large cross-national samples should be interpreted with caution, as they may not adequately represent the effects of key causal mechanisms.

Publications:

Rosen, Jennifer.  2013.  “The Effects of Political Institutions on Women’s Political Representation: a Comparative Analysis from 1992-2010.”  Political Research Quarterly.  66(2): 306-321.  http://prq.sagepub.com/content/66/2/306.abstract

Rosen, Jennifer.  Forthcoming, June 2014.  “Gender & Political Representation.”  Network News.  Sociologists for Women in Society: Lawrence, KS. 

Rosen, Jennifer.  “Gender Quotas for Women in National Politics: A Comparative Analysis across Development Thresholds.”  Under review at Social Problems as of May. 27, 2014.

Rosen, Jennifer.  2005.  “1979 March on Washington for Gay and Lesbian Civil Rights.” GLBT History.  Salem Press: Pasadena, CA. 

Awards:

Honorable Mention, Political Research Quarterly Best Article Published in 2013. Western Political Science Association.
Northwestern University Presidential Fellowship (2010-2012)
Buffet Center for International and Comparative Studies Travel Grant (2011, 2009)
Northwestern University Research Improvement Grant (2011)
Graduate Dissertation Research Grant (2009)
Robert F. Winch Award for Outstanding Second Year Paper (2008)
Northwestern University Frisen Grant (2007, 2008)

Back to top


Brian Sargent

BrianSargent2008@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:
"Enemies will be made: Organizational identity, governance, and community development policy implementation”

Areas of Interest:
Policy Implementation, Organizations, Urban Sociology, Economic Sociology, Political Sociology, Critical Theory

Biography:
I am broadly interested in the intersection of organizational studies, policy implementation, politics and urban studies. I have a particular interest in governance decisions made by actors that do not necessarily see their actions as being especially consequential. These actions, when actually viewed as governance, can contribute in new ways to our understandings of the politics of policy implementation.

My dissertation examines the Federal Reserve’s early efforts to implement the anti-redlining enforcement policy, the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, with a specific focus on the relationship between organizational identity and governance in the policy implementation process. Most scholarship on the first decade of the CRA has characterized it as an ineffectual and inconsequential policy intervention. However, while it was unable to successfully enforce anti-redlining laws to increase access to credit among low- and moderate-income households, it was not without considerable influence. I demonstrate that the CRA played an integral role in the injection of powerful market-based ideologies in community development politics. This finding is uncovered through a unique analytical approach that emphasizes the roles of institutionally marginalized actors and reveals their influence in the policy implementation process. By focusing on the subjective experience of bureaucratic governance, this project challenges standard paradigms of community development politics and complicates our understandings of bureaucratic governance.

Back to top


Lisa-Jo van den Scott

Lisa-Jo K. van den Scott

ljvandenscott@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title: 

"A Sociology of Walls: Everyday Lived Experience and Features of the Home in a Post-Nomadic Arctic Hamlet"

Areas of Interest:
 
Space/Place, Culture, Identity, Symbolic Interaction, STS, Qualitative Methods

Biography:

Lisa-Jo van den Scott’s dissertation examines the experiences of space and place, identity, and knowledge transmission in a Canadian Inuit hamlet. Permanent housing, and thus permanent walls, have only been introduced to this population within the last 50 years. Van den Scott examines how they relate to their walls and use their walls to express identity, as a locus for collective memory, for storage, and for privacy. She attends to changing conceptions of public and private, symbolically connected interior spaces, and how the divisions of rooms have affected the transmission of family as well as gendered knowledge. In addition, she finds that living within the walls, apart from the locus of traditional knowledge, impacts how the Inuit not only perform identity work, but also relate to their own sense of ethnic identity, creating an awareness of knowledge and identity as interlinked. Having lived among the Inuit for five years, and having returned for additional research trips, van den Scott uses a combination of ethnography and formal interviews, as well as innovative uses of photography and cognitive mapping.

Back to top


Jill D. Weinberg

jweinberg@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title: 

"The Regulation of Legal Consent: Policing Good and Pain"

Areas of Interest:  Sociology of Law; Deviance; Gender & Sexuality; Death; Medicine; Research Methods; Social Movements.

Biography:

Jill D. Weinberg is a sociologist, lawyer, and a Research Associate at the American Bar Foundation whose research examines the social construction of consent in communities that lie at the margins of law. In 2014-15, she will be a Visiting Assistant Professor at DePaul University where she will teach courses on deviant behavior, research methods, gender, and death.

Her dissertation-to-book project explores the relationship between law and culture in the construction of consent. The project, funded by the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, as well as Northwestern University, is a study based on two years of ethnographic research and 92 semi-structured interviews of participants involved in activities where consenting to pain and injury is central to the activity but carry different legal statuses under criminal battery law: illegal sexual sadomasochism (BDSM) and legally permitted mixed martial arts (MMA). When the law proscribes a person’s consent to an activity, consent is constructed and regulated by the participants engaged in the conduct. By contrast, when law recognizes a person’s consent in an activity, consent becomes constructed and regulated by an authority rather than by participants themselves. And, where consent does not enjoy the force of law, participants are – paradoxically – safer.

She has published eight articles in journals, including Sociological Methods & Research, Sociological Science, and Law & Social Inquiry. She is a regular a contributor for the "Huffington Post," and the “The Life of the Law,” a multimedia program devoted to discussions about law in everyday life. Opinion editorials based on her research have appeared in outlets such as the “Talking Points Memo,” "Truth-Out," and “the Advocate,” the largest U.S. circulating magazine devoted to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues (LGBT).

Back to top


Christine Wood

ChristineWood2011@u.northwestern.edu

CV

Dissertation Title:

“Making Gender Matter. Gendered Opportunities, Contested Research Objects, and the Making of an Interdisciplinary Field: Women’s and Gender Studies in American Universities, 1970-2010”

Areas of Interest: 

Sociology of Culture; Sociology of Knowledge/Science; Sociology of Gender; Theory.

Biography:

My dissertation examines the development of research programs on women and gender in American universities since 1970. Knowledge production about gender has been shaped by complex historical transitions impacting higher education, as well as “ecological” conditions within individual programs and universities. Women’s studies programs began with similar intellectual goals: to address the lack of scholarship on women and sex stratification in traditional disciplines and to produce research on women. As interdisciplinary units spread scholars with varied perspectives on gender analysis redefined the focus of programs across institutions, incorporating diverse topics like masculinity and sexual orientation, leading to plural research agendas across contexts. The diversification of research agendas and program structures is the result of evolving ecological differences across local contexts, as well as the intellectually “supple” quality of objects of analysis like “women” and “gender,” which can be defined and used in different ways. My argument that programs began with homogenous content and became more distinct contributes a new model of disciplinary and organizational development. The argument is distinct from “new institutional” models which see organizations as increasingly homogenous despite distinct structural origins, as well as traditional models that see organizations as bearing the structural imprints of the their origins over time. I also present a case of “gendered” opportunities in academic research professions, by explaining how women’s studies programs opened opportunities for scholars to conduct research on women, gender, and sexuality and to pursue research careers in these areas. Data are archival records from 11 women’s and gender studies departments and programs, semi-structured interviews with professors, data on employment and career trajectories of scholars with appointments in programs, and content analysis of research output.

Back to top


FACULTY SEARCHES

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY's Department of Sociology invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track, Assistant Professor position to begin in the Fall of 2015.  More information.


NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY'S Department of Sociology invites applications for a full-time, benefits-eligible, non-tenure eligible faculty appointment as Assistant Professor of Instruction, beginning September 1, 2015. More infromation.


NEED EXPERT ADVICE?

Our faculty advisers can help you select Sociology courses, even if Sociology isn't your major or minor.

Searle Center for Advancing Learning & Teaching provides a variety of programs and workshops for graduate students and faculty interested in developing their teaching practices. In addition, the Searle Center offers a variety of programs for graduate students seeking to develop their skills as Teaching Assistant (TA) and instructor , such as, a yearly conference for new TA's, a teaching certificate program and fellowship opportunities.


 

Upcoming Events

"The Humanities in the Age of Ecological Catastrophe” with Deborah Coen and Timothy Morton
November 4, 20144:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Ethnography Workshop: David Schaillol, University of Chicago
November 4, 20145:00 PM - 6:30 PM

October 13, 2014